Did You Know You May Already Have Video Chat? Our Clients Know!

One of the things Pamela A. Myers, Christa Frank High and Dan Siegel (at Integrated Technology Services LLC) repeatedly explain to clients is that the software they already own can usually meet their needs – because the products have many more features than they realize. A great example is Microsoft 365 Office, which has many apps and features users don’t know exist.

For example, if you have Office 365, you have Teams, known for its Chat feature. But Teams also has video chat. Here are Microsoft’s instructions for setting up a group video chat:

Start a call from a chat in Teams

You can make one-on-one or group calls with anyone in your organization directly from a chat without having to host a team meeting. These calls are private and won’t appear in any team conversation. Entries for the calls will appear in your chat, though.

Go to your chat list, and click New chat New chat button to start a new conversation.

Type the name or names into the To field at the top of your new chat.

Then click Video call Video call button or Audio call Calls button to start a call.

Up to 20 people can be on the same video call.

Note: If a group chat includes more than 20 people, calling buttons will be disabled.

Video call, Audio call, and Add people buttons

If you’re not currently in a chat with the person you want to call, you can start a new call from a command. Go to the command box at the top of your screen and type /call, then type or select the name of the person you want to reach.

You can also start a one-on-one call from someone’s profile card. Open it by clicking their picture in a channel or from a search.

About Dan Siegel

Dan Siegel authors the Technology column in The Philadelphia Lawyer, quarterly magazine of the Philadelphia Bar Association; he also authors the Technology column in Trial Magazine, the official publication of the American Association for Justice (formerly the Association of Trial Lawyers of America (ATLA)). Dan is a nationally-known writer and lecturer about technology in law offices and in litigation. Sensing the need for a firm to address the technology needs of attorneys, Dan opened Integrated Technology Services, LLC, which focuses exclusively upon ways for lawyers and legal support staff to handle cases more efficiently. An attorney since 1984, Dan serves in many technology-related positions. He is Vice-Chair of the Philadelphia Bar Association Law Practice Management Division and co-chairs its Practice Technology Committe. A solo practitioner, Dan chaired the Computer Committee at Anapol Schwartz in Philadelphia. Dan is also a certified Trainer for LiveNote and certified to support and train Time Matters, CaseMap, TimeMap and LegalFiles.
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